0
Press
Front Burner by Florence Fabricant
Kobrick’s has been roasting and selling coffee wholesale since 1920, first in Lower Manhattan and now in Hoboken, N.J. But in today’s coffee culture, the family’s fourth generation, Scott Kobrick and his sister, Nikole Kobrick, thought the company should also have a retail presence. With the approval of their mother and uncle, who are still involved in the company, the siblings have opened a cafe in the meatpacking district where baristas do double duty as mixologists, pouring Negronis as easily as macchiatos after 4:30. And not just any Negronis. Using a Japanese cold-brew drip contraption, they infuse the drink with coffee, adding a dimension of earth-driven bitterness. Other drinks, made with and without the coffee component, include a Bloody Mary that relies on a Chemex carafe to produce. They are working with Tobin Ludwig of Hella Bitters to create cocktails. Wines and light food are also served: Kobrick Coffee Company, 24 Ninth Avenue (13th Street), 212-255-5588, kobrickcoffee.com.
Spiking Coffee Gives New York Bars a Fresh Buzz
Kobrick Coffee Company. has been roasting beans since 1920, originally in Lower Manhattan and now New Jersey. This year it opened its first retail shop, a quaint Italian-style cafe in the meatpacking district.

But that’s not the only thing novel about this old-timey cafe. Besides the usual coffee drinks like macchiatos and cortados, the cafe serves what it calls “coffee cocktails,” alcoholic drinks with a zing of caffeine.

Top sellers include the Mexican Jumping Bean, a frothy concoction of reposado tequila, a ristretto espresso shot and flavored liqueurs, and the Three Hour Kyoto Negroni, made with a mix of gin, campari and vermouth that is then slow-dripped over a Kenyan coffee through a long, cylindrical tube.

“There’s a lot of synergies between coffee preparation and cocktail preparation,” said Scott Kobrick, 30, the boyish fourth-generation member of the family business who spearheaded the idea for a cafe. “In many European countries, a barista is a bartender, as a literal translation, and coffee is used as an ingredient in their bar program, and the bartenders use similar tools, too.”

Customers have taken to the inventive drinks with glee. “The tequila gets me very hyper and the espresso brings me to a whole new level,” said Ebony Vizcarrondo, 24, a server at the nearby Standard hotel, who was nursing a Mexican Jumping Bean on a recent Thursday after work.

To read more, click link above.
Buzzed and Wired at Kobrick Coffee Co.
In “A Moveable Feast,” the consummate day drinker Ernest Hemingway narrates his order in a Paris café: a café au lait, two servings of Martinique rum, and a half carafe of dry white wine. The great buzzed and wired bard of the Jazz Age would have liked Kobrick Coffee, where the baristas are cross-trained as mixologists and the creative synergy between the twin disciplines of craft coffee and craft cocktails rises to the level of art. From early morning until late afternoon, the place churns to the rhythms of aproned barmen grinding beans for espresso and tapping pitchers of steamed milk to break up the bubbles. By 8 P.M., the lights are dimmed, candles and dainty bud vases are set out, and a menu board rolls back to reveal a handsome liquor cabinet. Sitting permanently atop the counter is a tall and intricate Japanese cold-brew apparatus, in which the makings of a Negroni drip slowly through freshly ground coffee, for the Three Hour Kyoto Negroni. The house take on the Old-Fashioned involves Four Roses bourbon that’s been plunged through an AeroPress, and the delectable Mexican Jumping Bean unites tequila with ristretto. The caffeinated permutations of familiar ingredients, combined with a playlist that swings restlessly from Ella Fitzgerald to Norwegian E.D.M., creates an atmosphere that is at once nostalgic and ultramodern, a reflection of the city itself. Enter past midnight and it’s as though you stepped into an Edward Hopper painting. A Bumble date would not be out of place, but neither would a solitary writing session over a caffè corretto, two fingers of Jamaican rum, and a Loca Mocha—a bottle of house-made chocolate milk spiked with Jameson. ♦
Your Barista Is Now a Mixologist
One of New York City’s most endearing new bars is actually in a coffee shop, run by a multi-generational family-owned roasting company. You won’t find a syrupy espresso martini on the menu at Kobrick Coffee, but you will be able to try amazing drinks made with coffee or using barista equipment. There could not be a better precursor to going out dancing. Kobrick’s Three Hour Kyoto Negroni incorporates gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari with Kobrick’s bright, full-bodied single-origin Kenyan coffee, and is made cold-brew style in a Yama drip tower. Then there’s the Old Slip, featuring an Aeropressed Sulawesi Indonesian brew with bourbon, demerara sugar, and bitters from the Queens-based Hella Bitters.
New York City has coffee covered courtesy of these beautifully designed cafés
Kobrick Coffee Co., Meatpacking District
By day this wood-paneled and exposed-brick brew house may seem like a perfectly innocuous space, but after the sun sets it transforms into a dark drinking den that resembles a Prohibition-era speakeasy. Family heirlooms occupy shelves behind a pewter-top bar, and the back room is a secluded niche with burnt-orange sofas and marble-top tables supported by antique coffee urns. 24 9th Avenue; kobrickcoffee.com

Coffee Shop and Bar Pours Buzzy Cocktails | By Charles Passy
Kobrick Coffee Co. has been providing restaurants throughout the New York area and the nation with all things java since 1920. Now the Jersey City-based coffee importer, roaster and distributor is making a move into the retail space with a coffee-and-cocktails concept.

Kobrick's eponymous store in the Meatpacking District offers a full array of coffee drinks, from cold-brew coffee to cappuccino. But the twist is that it also offers craft cocktails, many of which incorporate coffee. A case in point: a version of a negroni, the popular Italian cocktail, that's made with a Kenyan-sourced coffee.

Niki Kobrick, part of the fourth generation of Kobricks, says the idea for combining coffee and cocktails stemmed from the recent artisan revolution in both beverage categories. And it allows the shop, which also offers a light food menu and sells bagged coffee, to stay open all day- from 7a.m. to 4a.m. - and appeal to different markets, from the office crowd to the club-going one.

"It's the place for the city that never sleeps,' said Ms. Kobrick.
Coffee Cocktails: Alcohol and Caffeine Go Together Quite Nicely by Jonah Flicker
Coffee and alcohol don't initially seem like the best ingredients to mix together in a cocktail. After all, alcohol is a depressant, and caffeine is a stimulant - won't a coffee cocktail just send your body into some sort of mixed message spiral? But bartenders around the nation are incorporating coffee in a variety of forms, from ground beans to syrup to infused liqueur, into their drink menus, finding that it actually complements many spirits quite nicely.

Kobrick Coffee Co. in New York City has been on the vanguard of this movement, featuring an expansive and creative coffee cocktail menu. "The right coffee paired with the right spirit works as well as the right liqueur paired with the right spirit," said cocktail consultant Tobin Ludwig. "Coffee complements spirits because it offers dynamic aromas, flavors and complexity that when done right, work beautifully with the nuanced flavor of the spirit." He suggests looking at coffee in the same way as wine, as its flavor is affected by similar variables like terroir and processing method. "If I had to call one spirit best for complementing coffee, it would be aged rum," said Ludwig. "The qualities of an aged, rum from sweetness level to body to complexity of flavor, tend to work beautifully with coffee." As far as the effects of combining caffeine with alcohol, he doesn't see an issue: "Another seemingly obvious note is the buzz," he said. "Adding caffeine to cocktails, as you would expect, creates an uplifting advantage."

Here are some of the coffee cocktails available at Kobrick Coffee Co.:

Click link above to read more.
7 Genius Spots Where You Can Get Both Cocktails and Coffee -by Dan Dao
It was in the 1920s that Sam Kobrick began producing coffee on the New York waterfront, founding one of New York’s oldest roasting companies. Now, fourth-generation roasters Niki and Scott Kobrick carry on that legacy with the family’s first brick-and-mortar shop, a brand-new all-day coffee and cocktail counter in the city’s Meatpacking District. The booze program, a collaboration between Hella Bitters co-founder Tobin Ludwig and head bartender Brian Averbuch, spotlights both concoctions built with coffee—including the Kyoto Negroni, layering the usual gin, vermouth and Campari with a three-hour drip of Kobrick’s single-origin Kenya coffee—as well as those drawing on the techniques of brewing, such as a Bloody Mary infusing vodka with fresh horseradish, habanero, salt, pepper and Worcestershire directly within a Chemex coffee filter.
Kobrick Coffee Co Launches New Summer Menu- Cocktails Included!
Coffee and Cocktail drinkers rejoice! Today, 4th Generation Craft Coffee Roasters, Kobrick Coffee Co., launches its NEW Summer Coffee & Cocktail menu at its cafe & cocktail bar hybrid locale in the Meatpacking district offering a dynamic and seasonal exploration into the fusion of coffee and mixology. With the warm weather upon us, the team at Kobrick Coffee Co. created a menu that incorporates their outstanding coffee & coffee knowledge and the refreshing bold flavors and ingredients inspired by the warm weather and summer vibes.

With fresh fruit, spicy herbs, new formats and thirst quenching potency, the new Summer cocktails at Kobrick Coffee Co. have taken their bar’s drink program to a whole new level, giving us an exciting and original presentation of the creative and wide range of possibilities that are possible when coffee & mixology are combined.
Kobrick Coffee Co.


Let’s be real—coffee cocktails have never been cool. But when a century-old roastery debuts a bar program serving inventive iterations of those once-disreputable java drinks in the Meatpacking District, it piques our interest. Fourth-generation Kobricks, siblings Scott and Niki, put a boozy twist on the family business (great-granddad Samuel Kobrick established the roastery and distributor Kobrick Coffee Co. in 1920), teaming up with Hella Bitters founder Tobin Ludwig for an all-day coffeeshop–cocktail-bar hybrid that will give you all kinds of buzz.


ORDER THIS: Cocktails with a caffeine jolt ($15), though you won’t find any espresso martinis here. Instead, modern coffee-spiked quaffs include the aromatic Mexican Jumping Bean, a blend of Kobrick’s full-bodied Tiger Stripe ristretto shot, reposado tequila and the citrusy amer China-China; and the Three Hour Kyoto Negroni, a smooth union of the traditional recipe with the roastery’s rich single-origin Kenya AA dripped through a sleek Yama brew tower. Although the shop’s pride and joy may be its house joe, coffeeless heavy hitters ($16) like the Chemex Bloody Mary (featuring vodka infused directly with fresh horseradish, habanero, lemon and Worcestershire sauce) and the Voodoo Guy (a margarita riff with jalapeño-infused mescal, lime juice and muddled ginger) do not disappoint either.

GOOD FOR: A mellow respite from rowdy MePa revelers vying for entry into velvet-roped clubs. Bargoers can settle onto stools at the front bar or head to the cozy back room, which has tufted chairs, velvet-backed banquettes and candlelit two-tops that transition easily from a daytime café to a late-night lounge. Percolators and coffee paraphernalia adorn the bar’s shelves, while the vintage tin ceiling, family photographs and lamps made from antique coffee urns nod to the establishment’s early-20th-century roots.

THE CLINCHER: Baristas pull double duty as bartenders, smoothly delivering cortados and composed cocktails day to night. And if you’re starting to feel the java jitters, baristas also moonlight as waiters, doling out light snacks and small plates ranging from a creamy smoked-salmon tartare studded with avocado ($14) to café standards like pressed sandwiches (Swiss and shallot, $10; turkey Cubano, $10) and cheese boards (each $5, four for $17). Serving from 7 to 2am, Kobrick is just the kind of pick-me-up you need in the city that never sleeps.

By: Tazi Phillips

Posted: Tuesday May 17 2016
Booze Bulletin
Café meets cocktail bar! At their first brick & mortar location which opened in the Fall, the 4th generation NYC craft coffee roasters debut their beverage program with a one-of-a-kind cocktail menu. Spend a relaxing day sipping espresso and snacking on café favorites or go on the later side and enjoy an evening with a potent coffee inspired libation in the bespoke drinking den. The cocktail menu is a collaboration between the Kobrick family and cocktail & spirits guru Tobin Ludwig of HELLA Bitters. Divided into three sections (see below), each part of the menu is an exploration into cocktails born through both traditional and innovative techniques as well as unexpected combinations. View venue details...

COCKTAIL MENU SECTIONS

Coffee: These cocktails use traditional coffee tools, methods & actual coffee to create uniquely delicious drinks. Try the Three Hour Kyoto Negroni

Signature & Seasonal: Inspired by the timeless as well as the seasonal, the cocktails in this section are thoughtful & distinctive. Try the seasonal Mackin Scotch.

Classic: The classic drinks pay homage to New York City and it’s surrounding areas. Try the Jersey Lightening.
Kobrick Coffee’s Cocktail Menu
A new cafe space has opened at coffee roasting company Kobrick Coffee. The cafe will feature coffee cocktails like Three Hour Kyoto Negroni, featuring Kobrick’s single-origin Kenya coffee brewed with a Yama Cold Brew Tower; the Old Slip Cocktail, with aero-pressed Sulawesi coffee, bourbon, and bitters; and the Mexican Jumping Bean, with Reposado tequila, a shot of Tiger Stripe ristretto espresso, Amer China China liqueur, and agave nectar.

Kobrick Coffee Bar
24 Ninth Ave.
kobricks.com
The 17 Best Iced Coffee Drinks In NYC
ICED COFFEE COCKTAIL: Kobrick's Coffee Co.

Kobrick's has been roasting coffee in New York since 1921. But it was earlier this year that they opened up their first cafe in the Meatpacking District and they take their coffee very seriously there. During the day, you can get your buzz on, but at night they transform to a cocktail bar. While many other mixology dens usually have one or two drinks featuring coffee, Kobrick's has an entire page dedicated to caffeine. If you only order one drink, the thing to try is the Three Hour Kyoto Negroni, where instead of water, the bartenders slow brew their Kenyan coffee using gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari. It's a surprising twist on everyone's favorite bitter cocktail. Stay wide awake while taking the edge off.
Booze Bulletin
NEW MENU at KOBRICK COFFEE CO.: To kick off the Summer season, the craft coffee and cocktail bar launches their NEW Summer Coffee & Cocktail offering a dynamic and seasonal exploration into the fusion of coffee and mixology. With the warm weather upon us, the menu incorporates refreshing bold flavors and seasonal ingredients. When we think Summer, we think punch and Kobrick redefines the typical punch recipe. Gather friends and convene over their new large format warm weather pick-me-up: the Black & Blue Punch made with Guji Cold Brew coffee, Smith & Cross Jamaican rum, lime juice, house blueberry syrup and angostura bitters. View the new booze menu...
Latte Art 3 Ways in 30 Seconds
Watch the video on Facebook ...
The Definitive Guide to Eating in NYC's Meatpacking District | Best coffee shop: Kobrick Coffee Co.
24 9th Ave

This place has a solid brunch menu (with fresh-baked pastries and avocado toast), alongside expertly roasted coffee blends you can buy by the bag. The coolest part, though, has to be the fact that once the evening rolls around, you have access to an expansive menu of cocktails ranging from the classic to the coffee-infused.
Up All Night
If you're the type who kicks of the night with an energy drink, I have the place for you. Kobrick Coffee Co. marries two essential vices...coffee and booze...
Stimulating Sprits
In New York City Kobrick Coffee Co. has launched a one-of-a-kind cocktail menu as its first brick-and-mortar location, challenging surrounding spirits purveyors to step up their game when it comes to stimulating sips...
Give Your Menu a Jolt with Cool Coffee Cocktails
At the recently opened Kobrick Coffee Co. in NYC, coffee meets alcohol in a number of quite unusual ways.

For starters, there’s the three-hour Kyoto Negroni, a tweak on the classic gin, Campari and sweet vermouth cocktail. The Kyoto Negroni is mixed and then run through the slow-drip device made famous in Kyoto, Japan, as a superior method of creating that tangy and low acid cold brew coffee. At Kobrick the device makes enough in three hours for about 10 servings. Luckily, the operators have so far been able to keep just ahead of the curve, as once it’s made the drink can last about 36 hours before losing any of its vibrancy.

The cocktail program, whipped into shape by Hella Bitters co-founder Tobin Ludwig, doesn’t stop there in relation to coffee. Coffee bars throughout America are expected to feature a broad variety of coffee drinks, and Kobrick delivers on that expectation. Putting their creativity on display, the Koco Freddo is made with shaken cold brew, coconut oil and egg white, while the Tiger Strip & Tonic is a mix of house espresso and Hella tonic syrup.

There are also many versions of classic cocktails, but more significantly there are several twists on coffee processes. Most notable among them is the Old Slip, their take on the Old Fashioned. For that riff on a classic Ludwig has developed a way to extract flavor from Sulawesi coffee using an Aeropress, a trendy by-the-cup process used at home by many coffee aficionados. Bartenders at Kobrick pour Four Roses bourbon into a press with a measured amount of the coffee, and after a brief rest the bourbon is forced through the press. Then Demerara sugar and two kinds of Hella Bitters are added, and another signature cocktail combining spirits with everyday ingredients in a new and compelling manner is born.

Other coffee cocktails are more traditionally crafted but no less interesting. These include the Mexican Jumping Bean (reposado tequila, ristretto shot, China-China Amer liqueur and agave nectar), the Stay at Home Dad (St. George NOLA Coffee Liqueur, Cointreau, Green Chartreuse, Laphroaig), and the Loca Mocha (ancho chile liqueur, Irish whiskey, chocolate milk, cold brew coffee, aromatic bitters). This inventiveness shows that, given a little thought, nearly any every day ingredient treated correctly can make new cocktails bloom.
Coffee Talk with Scott Kobrick of Kobrick Coffee Co.
Founded by the Kobrick family during the 1920s, Kobrick Coffee Co. has a deep-rooted history you can feel just stepping foot into the Meatpacking flagship. With an old New York City charm you can’t quite capture anywhere else, you’d think the cozy café had been there forever—seemingly untouched by the new wave of boutiques and trendy hotels.

The family-owned and operated coffee company has been serving up beans and brews for many, many years, but now, in the corners of the Meatpacking café, they’re combining years of roasting and research with a whole new endeavor: cocktails.

Read more in link above...
Craft, Coffee and Cocktails at 96-Year-Old Kobrick’s First Bar in New York
On Jan. 17 of 1920, the year Samuel Kobrick began roasting under the name Kobrick Coffee Co., he might have seen have seen law officers pouring the contents of hundreds of barrels and bottles into the Hudson River, as Prohibition took effect.

Now 96 years later, across the Hudson in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, Kobrick Coffee Co.’s first branded retail café has opened with a dual focus on craft coffee and cocktails, the dueling darlings of Prohibition-era drinking. In the company’s own words, it is “transforming the space from an authentic brew house during the day to an inviting, old-world drinking den at night.”

The coffee bar at 24 9th Avenue — a notable undertaking for a company that has existed to this point almost exclusively on wholesale relationships with restaurants and cafés — was led by fourth-generation Kobricks Scott and Nikole, who both currently serve as the company’s vice presidents.

Click link above to read more...
Pouring All the Beans into a Family Business
How the younger generation feel about a family business begins at a very young age. When it comes time to make a career choice, early impressions can have profound results that shape a lifetime career. According to Nikole Kobrick of Kobrick Coffee Co., a fourth generation specialty coffee roaster ...

Click link above to read more...
The Firestarters | Getting to Know Michael Calabrese
Michael Angelo Calabrese is from New York and calls himself the roastmaster extraordinaire for Kobrick Coffee Company, one of the oldest independent coffee roasters in the country. On his way to the track he told me all about apocalyptic dreamscapes, the benefits of the roasting community and how even though he thinks of himself more as Dallas Winston from S.E. Hinton's The Outsiders , we can all identify with Pony Boy...

Click link above to read more...
Kobrick: Hudson's Coffee Company
Three-fourths of Kobrick is actually in Jersey City at 693 Marin Blvd., according to Lee Kobrick - a third-generation owner of the family-run business. White trucks bearing teh company logo are conspicuously parked outside the former meatpacking plant, which is now the site for Kobrick Coffee...

Click link above to read more...
Dark Velvet and Other Coffees
Kobrick, a coffee company that was started in 1920 ... is an excellent source for high-quality coffees. Varietal coffees like Ethiopian Yirgacheffe and special blends are sold wholesale and retail. The blends, including one called DArk Velvet that companies Kenya AA, Colombian Supremo and Java Estate are delicious.
Family-owned factories keep Hudson tradition alive
It's hard to tell if the Kobrick brothers are just wildly enthusiastic businessmen or if a lifetime in th ecoffee business has left them with a permanent caffeine buzz. The owners of Kobrick Coffee Co., a firm started by their grandfather in 1920 on Manhattans Water Street, they moved to their current location on the Jersey City-Hoboken border in 1983 and are now riding the wave of popularity in specialty coffees.

Click link above for more...
Flavored Coffee Review
Kobrick has available 14 different flavors of coffee including...

Read more, click link above...
A Hot Cup of Java Turns into Cold Cash
At mid-morning in the turn-of-the-century offices of coffee roaster Kobrick Coffee in Jersey City, co-owners Lee, 42, and Steven, 38, grandsons of the company's founder, Samuel Kobrick, call their workers upstairs, where they gather around a large, antique oak table. There the two brothers prepare to cup a newly delivered batch of coffee beans. The age-old family ritual takes place two or three times a day, Lee explains, because they've found that "it's still teh best and most effective way to check the consistency of the quality of the beans being shipped here."

Samuel Kobrick's legacy is a strong one. For 75 years, Kobrick Coffee has been roasting coffee beans for the finest restaurants in New York City. Samuel, who died in 1967, passed along ownership to the company to his son Frank, the father of Lee and Steven and Frank's brother, Sonny.

Click link above to read more...
Kobrick's Coffes Named Best in Focused Tasting
In a blind coffee tasting conducted by Restaurants, Resorts and Hotels magazine, Jersey City, New Jersey-based Kobrick Coffee Company was one of seven roasters to finish on top. Ranked the "best" for its Colombian Supremo and French Blend coffees, Kobrick's was one on 19 participating roasters in the day-long event. Kobrick is a third-generation family owned coffee roaster/retailer which has serviced upscale retail operations and fine restaurants and hotels in the New York area for over 70 years.
Woodstock
"Free Coffee for the Naked" was the favorite motto to draw additional attention to the four Kobrick booths, and to no one's surprise many people took advantage of the rare opportunity. The feeling of working in an extremely busy espresso bar changed into working the front lines of a battlefield as soon as th rain set in Saturday night. Temperatures dropped to about 50 degrees and Kobrick Coffee was the only hot beverage available to the freezing masses. The formerly verdant pastures quickly turned into a sea of mud more than six inches deep and Kobrick employees frequently witnessed mud baths and mud dives in front of the booths. The thought of "free coffee for the mud-people" was quickly dismissed. The wait for the hot liquid was almost one hour, due to the odd conditions. But the appreciation in the eyes of the coffee lovers made every drink worth the pain, the lack of sleep and the many hardships. Would we do it again? Yes...No...Maybe!
The Sweet Smell of Success
Kobrick stands astride the intersection of the old coffee business and the new. Still family-owned, it is run by two of the founder's grandsons, Steve and Lee Kobrick, brothers in their late 30's.

Steve and Lee talk about buying coffee from grandsons of people their grandfater bought from, and their pride in the connection with the industry's traditions is plain to see. But they really light up when they talk about the changes in the coffee business, how they've kept up and their plans for the future...

Read more, click link above...
The Rise of the Roasters; Meet Jersey City's Kings of Caffeine
“We’ve been Fair Trade certified for nearly a decade,” says Steven Kobrick, chief operating officer and vice president of Jersey City-based Kobrick Coffee Company. “It’s something we knew our customers would appreciate.”

Kobrick has been personally involved in the family business, which dates back to 1920, since the mid-1980s, giving him a prime vantage point with which to observe the industry’s transformation.

“It used to be that you’d have to go to coffee specialty
stores to find certain roasts,” he says, but that changed in the ‘80s and ‘90s, he says, as gourmet markets became
more common and consumer sophistication increased. “Coffee roasters at the time saw an opportunity to offer single origin specific coffees due to the increased interest,” Kobrick says. “That’s when you started to see roasts like mocha Java blends where you’d once see generic coffee pots.”
Located at the northernmost end of Marin Boulevard, Kobricks more or less straddles the line between Jersey City and Hoboken. The open, high-ceilinged ground floor of the large two-story brick building is dedicated to the production side, with a large garage door for truck deliveries and pickups and, through a door, the coffee processing area. It’s here that both the industrial-sized coffee bean roaster (capable of roasting up to 500 lbs of beans at a time) and the special-order small roaster are housed, and from where the coffee aroma has seeped into everything from ...

Click link above for full article...
Please Close Add/Edit Window in Order to Contunue